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McCulloch Family History & Ancestry

Family Crest Motto: VI ET ANIMO (by strength and courage)

Allow me to share with you the captivating tale of your family, the McCullochs. This name, prominently residing in Galloway and Wigtownshire, carries the rich essence of Celtic origin. Yet, the story is interwoven with various interpretations. The Irish Gaelic ‘MacCu’uladh’, which translates to ‘son of the Hound of Ulster’, unfolds as ‘Maccullagh’ in English. In the realm of Scots Gaelic, it takes on the form of ‘Maccullaich’, embodying the significance of ‘son of the boar’. Both interpretations, though distinct, echo descriptive personal names that evoke fierce energy.

A further branch extends northward, around Oban, descending from the Macdougalls. It’s possible they derive their name from ‘MacLulaich’, which could mean ‘son of the little calf’. While the precise meaning remains shrouded, it’s yet another portrayal of personal attributes. The roots of the Argyllshire McCullochs are believed to trace back to Lulach, son of Gilla Comgan, the Celtic Mormaer or Earl of Moray.

Your family emerges prominently in Galloway, with the figure of Thomas Maculagh, ‘Counte de Wyggtone’, etched onto the Ragman Roll of 1296, a tribute to Edward I of England. This same individual could have been Thomas Makhulagh, appointed sheriff of Wigtown in 1305. Through the fourteenth century, your family’s presence is evident in various charters, with Sir Patrick M’Owlache being reinstated to his lands in 1363, after their forfeiture, seemingly due to allegiance to the English.

The esteemed office of sheriff of Wigtown shifted hands to the Agnew family of Lochnaw, who retain the title even today. In 1488, Quinton Agnew, then sheriff of Wigtown, was tasked with returning possessions to Archibald McCulloch, including a collection of oxen, sheep, horses, and more. The year 1507 bears witness to the McCulloch chief’s retaliation, as he laid waste to the Isle of Man in response to a raid on the town of Kirkcudbright, which was then under the rule of the Earl of Derby.

Over time, your family took possession of the lands of Myretoun, leading to their elevation into a barony around 1566. The rank of baronet was bestowed upon them in 1634, but it met an unfortunate conclusion when Sir Godfrey McCulloch was executed in Edinburgh in 1697, accused of the murder of William Gordon. The magnitude of the trial secured its place in the illustrious Pitcairn’s Criminal Trials of Scotland.

Yet, the legacy persisted through the passage of kinship. Your family’s representation continued through cousins, the McCullochs of Ardwall, and other branches. Among these, Major General Sir Andrew McCulloch of Ardwall stands as a living embodiment of valor, serving with distinction in both the Boer War (1899-1902) and the First World War (1914-18), earning the Distinguished Service Order three times over.

Your family’s journey echoes with courage, resilience, and an enduring connection to your ancestral heritage. This rich narrative of history stands as a source of inspiration, reminding us all of the remarkable spirit that courses through the veins of the McCulloch family, driving them through the ages.

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Family Crest Motto: VI ET ANIMO (by strength and courage)

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